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HITECH Act Regulations for Business Associate Agreement Compliance

November 23rd, 2020

The requirements of HIPAA compliance have been changed greatly with the ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) and the Title XIII of it is called HITECH “Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health” Act. With this latest law introduction, now the business associates are answerable for the security and privacy requirements which were previously necessary only for the covered entities. Additionally, the business associates are also subject to criminal and civil penalties. In the law, there is a provision included that permits the patients to obtain financial recompense for privacy violations.

In this latest federal medical privacy law an extra strength is also added in the enforcement part of the act. The important changes include:

Workforce members and employees, also includes independent contractors, all are subject to civil penalties for violations. It means that individuals are now liable legally. There is also the necessity for HHS to investigate formally about any objections and to enforce civil penalties for disobedience of rules if this disobedience is because of willful neglect. It is a requirement of this law that any monetary settlements or social monetary penalties which arise due to the disobedience of rules will involve the OCR “Office of Civil Rights” for enforcement of security and privacy rules. Social financial penalties now have a tiered system that range from 100$ to 50,000$ depending on offense. The HHS secretary is required to perform periodic audits to assure that the covered business associates and entities are complaint with the new rules. The Attorney General of the state has power to take suit in regional courts for disobedience on behalf of their state residents.

In response to any complaint, the business associates can take some steps. In these steps the first thing is to be sure that you are correctly classified. For instance, you are an independent contractor and a service provider and you are not directly working with the covered entity, it means that you are not business associate. But, you are subcontractor or an agent for the business associate. It is very important for an independent contractor to know if his contract is with the covered entity which makes him a business associate and the all new laws apply on him.

Some things that must be considered are as follows: assigning responsibility for observance to one person. Although you can assign a team to work on observance issues, the name of one person should be the official compliance officer and must be responsible. This person should not be an employee but can be a supervisor or manager. A consultant may be used if you think he works well. But it is required that you someone designated for this position.

Before signing a business associate agreement, you must be sure about both privacy and security rules. Many points are there to be observed about these rules. You must follow the written procedures and policies. You must have an emergency plan for any type of business disturbance. Understand that you are accountable for all the actions of the workforce. It is requirement of the rules to train the workforce and the policy should be documented. For remote workers supervision will be more challenging but possible.

How the HITECH Act Impacts a Business Associate

November 5th, 2020

HIPAA compliance requirements have been greatly changed with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and its Title XIII called the HITECH (Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health) Act. With the introduction of this new law, business associates are now accountable for the privacy and security requirements that previously were required only by covered entities. In addition, a business associate is now subject to civil and criminal penalties. This also includes a provision that lets patients receive financial compensation for a violation of their privacy.

This new federal law has added strength to the enforcement portion of the law. The significant changes include:

Employees and other workforce members, including independent contractors, are now subject to civil penalties. This means that individuals are also now accountable legally.
There is a requirement for HHS to formally investigate any complaints and to impose civil penalties for violations of the rules if the violation is due to “willful” neglect.
The law requires that any civil monetary penalties or monetary settlements as a result of a violation of the rules be sent to the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) for enforcement of the privacy and security rules.
Civil monetary penalties now have a tiered system ranging from $100 to $50,000 depending on the offense.
The Secretary of HHS is required to conduct periodic audits to be sure that covered entities and business associates are compliant with the new rules.
The State Attorneys General now have the authority to bring suit in district courts for any violation on behalf of the residents of their state.

What Steps Should a Business Associate Take to be sure you are Compliant?

The first step is being sure you are properly classified. For example, if you are an independent contractor working for a service and not directly contracting with a covered entity, that probably means you are not a business associate, but an agent or subcontractor of a business associate. It is important, however, for independent contractors to understand if your contract is directly with the covered entity, that makes you a business associate and all of the new laws do apply to you.

Some things you need to consider include:

Assigning responsibility for compliance to one person. While you can have a team working on compliance issues, one person must be named as the compliance officer and be responsible. This does not have to be an employee and you can use a consultant if that works best for you, however, it is critical that you have this person identified.
Encryption of all electronic files. The HITECH Act has made the use of encryption the one thing that provides a “safe harbour” for not having a breach. Data that is not encrypted is considered unsecured according to the law. While you may already be using encryption for data transfers, this law also requires that information be encrypted while “at rest.” This may require that you add encryption to all electronic files that are stored anywhere on your system. If you are in medical transcription, remember that this will also include the voice files stored on any dictation system. The Secretary of HHS will review these standards annually for any changes.
Breach notifications. While HIPAA has always required that a business associate notify their client of any breaches of information, the law now makes you responsible for being sure the notification is done. A breach is defined as acquisition, access, use or disclosure of unsecured PHI that is not permitted under HIPAA and that compromises the privacy or security of the information. Remember that unsecured data means unencrypted. Documentation of breech notifications must be kept for six years.
Be sure you are compliant with both the privacy and security rules. There are many points to consider in these rules. You must have written policies and procedures. You must have a written risk analysis done. You also must have a contingency plan in place for any kind of business disruption. Your systems also have to provide audit trails for who accesses protected health information.
Realize you are responsible for the actions of your workforce. The rules require training of the workforce, which must be done and documented. If you have remote workers, this can be more of a challenge, but it is possible.
Another significant change is that business associates are now responsible for trying to stop any violations by the covered entity (their client). This includes things even up to canceling your contract with a client who refuses to fix a violation or prefers to ignore the law. Both parties are responsible for doing this for the other, and this could very well change some of the relationships you currently have with your clients.
Documentation. Remember, it’s all about being sure you have things documented. Use the rule of thumb that says “if it’s not documented, it wasn’t done.” It is no longer acceptable to just say you are compliant. You must have written documentation to show that you have done all of the required steps.

The changes that have come as a result of the HITECH Act certainly have a big impact on business associates. The date for compliance is past. If you haven’t taken the required steps, now is the time to do it.

Kathy Nicholls has been involved in the medical transcription industry for over 30 years and is currently the president of the HIPAA4MT Site [http://hipaa4mt.com], which offers guidance for medical transcriptionists and medical transcription companies on compliance with HIPAA and the HITECH Act. She also operates the MT Tools Online [http://mttoolsonline.com] website, which provides continuing education for healthcare documentation professionals. Nicholls is also the published author of the “Stedman’s Guide to the HIPAA Privacy Rule,” and is working on the second edition of that book. She is a certified medical transcriptionist and a Fellow of the Association for Healthcare Documentation Integrity.

Business Associates of Covered Entities Under HIPAA

October 22nd, 2020

This article addresses in general terms the requirements of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) as supplemented by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 (“HITECH Act”) on the discrete issue of privacy requirements placed upon “covered entities” in regard to their business associates. Before tackling the issue of contracts between covered entities and their business associates, let us first discuss the HIPAA privacy rule in general before focusing upon the relationship between covered entities and their outside contractors.

Basically, the HIPAA privacy rule includes standards for protection of individually identifiable health information, known in regulatory parlance as Protected Health Information (“PHI”). “Individually identifiable health information” is data that relates to an individual’s past, present or future physical or mental health or condition for which there is a reasonable basis to believe the data can be used to identify said individual. The HIPAA privacy rule applies to certain health care providers, health plans, and health care clearinghouses (“covered entities”) creating standards for protection of PHI and an individual’s rights with regard to his or her PHI. More specifically, covered entities are defined as “health plans, health care clearinghouses, and to any health care provider who transmits health information in electronic form in connection with transactions for which the Secretary of HHS has adopted standards under HIPAA.” See Summary of the HIPAA Privacy Rule at HHS website. What information is protected? “All medical records and other individually identifiable health information used or disclosed by a covered entity in any form, whether electronically, on paper, or orally, are covered by the final rule.” See About HIPAA Privacy Rule at CDC website.

Although the HIPAA statute itself only speaks of privacy restrictions placed upon covered entities, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued regulations extending the reach of the HIPAA privacy rules to business associates of covered entities. A business associate is an outside contractor that performs activities involves the use or disclosure of PHI by the covered entity to the contractor. Examples includes accountants, medical billing firm, or an independent medical transcriptionist.

“The Privacy Rule requires that the satisfactory assurances obtained from the business associate be in the form of a written contract (or other written arrangement, as between governmental entities) between the covered entity and the business associate that contains the elements specified at Sec. 164.504(e). For example, the agreement must identify the uses and disclosures of protected health information the business associate is permitted or required to make, as well as require the business associate to put in place appropriate safeguards to protect against a use or disclosure not permitted by the contract or agreement.” Modifications to the HIPAA Privacy Rule, HHS Explanation of Final Regulations (August 14, 2002) Link. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 (“HITECH Act”) placed additional requirements on safeguarding PHI. Most notably, HITECH obligates business associates of covered entities to comply with HIPAA’s Security Rule for administrative, physical, and technical safeguard of PHI.

The upshot of the foregoing is that covered entities must enter into contracts with their business associates who have access to PHI. No specific wording is mandated by the regulations; however, a covered entity’s contract with business associates must contain the elements set forth in 45 CFR 164.504(e), i.e., the final HIPAA regulations promulgated by HHS. For example, the contract must describe the permitted uses of PHI and provide that the business associate will not use or disclose PHI other than as permitted by the contract. HITECH requires a business associate, upon discovery of a breach of security of PHI under its control, to notify the covered entity, which then must notify the impacted individual. This duty of the business associate to disclose breaches of PHI security to the covered entity should also be in the contract.

The HIPAA Privacy Rule excepts from the above standard certain disclosures by a covered entity. Specifically, the standard does not apply to disclosures by a covered entity to a health care provider for treatment purposes; disclosures to the plan sponsor by a group health plan, or a health insurance issuer or HMO with respect to a group health plan, to the extent that the requirements of Sec. 164.504(f) apply and are met; or to the collection and sharing of protected health information by a health plan that is a public benefits program and an agency other than the agency administering the health plan, where the other agency collects protected health information for, or determines eligibility or enrollment with respect to, the government program, and where such activity is authorized by law. See Regulation Sec. 164.502(e)(1)(ii).

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Why Start and Incorporate a Business Association

October 13th, 2020

When you are starting a business, one of your main objectives is the potential expansion of your company and to become a major player in the market. There are many ways to grow and today we want to show you an effective way to join forces with your competitors and incorporating a Business Association. Ideally this Association would be representative of your industry and will include major companies in the sector. Establishing a new Association is rather simple and inexpensive. Incorporating an Association requires some paperwork but benefits outweigh the time and effort.

But remember there are differences between an incorporated Business Association and non-incorporated Association. We always encourage incorporating your Association as they offer several practical and potential benefits.

Here are some benefits that may help you to decide:

Accessing to More Funds
By starting an Association you have the ability to borrow funds from banks. Also by qualifying for tax exempt status, it is more likely to have access to public and private grants. You may use these funds in starting campaigns in order to promote your products or industry.

Tax Exemption
Business Associations usually are exempt from paying property and income taxes. In another word as long as income is related to charitable activities, your Association will not pay income tax on it.

Power of Advocacy
By forming a Business Association you will have the power to influence politics and lobby among decision-making public authorities and use this power in benefiting of your industry.

Protection from Personal Liabilities
Your Association can be a target of an unwanted lawsuit due to its advocacy efforts however, incorporated Association will play its role to put you in a better situation and protect you from potential issues. A Business Association may be sued, but its legal protections will shield personal belongings of members and officers such as properties, vehicles and money which are generally protected from personal liability.

Gather Donations
When you are working for the right cause you will be amazed to know that there are many donors out there willing to help you. Tax laws usually encourage people and corporations to donate funds and properties to non-profit organizations. If your Business Association qualifies as a tax exempt organization, it is more likely to gather donations, as donors can deduct it on federal and state tax returns.

Separate Legal Status
A Business Association has its own legal status and bylaws and as a result, it has the power to sign contracts in its own name, giving them the ability to have transactions apart from its members or officers. An Association may also take legal action against others if necessary.

Property Ownership
An Incorporated Business Association has the right of holding a property title. You may find it strange but in some places unincorporated Associations do not have this right to hold a title on their name.

There are also other small benefits to the incorporation of a Business Association which vary by country and location. For example in the United States of America you can get a discount on your postage.

Your Local Business Association

September 25th, 2020

As a small business owner you need to carefully pick and choose where your hard-earned money is going to go. Maybe you’ve considered joining your local business association but aren’t sure it’s worth the cost of the yearly dues, or maybe you simply don’t know enough about the benefits such an association can provide.

Annual dues for membership vary from association to association. Generally they range from $25.00 to $250.00. But, you get what you pay for, which means those with higher fees offer more benefits. Dues are used to pay for speakers, meeting rooms and special events, as well as cover any administrative and printing costs (for newsletters and other publications). They usually include a listing in the association’s directory, subscription to the monthly newsletter, and sometimes, one (business size) ad in the newsletter.

Ultimately, deciding to join your local business association is up to you, but understanding the benefits such associations provide will help you make that decision.

Ask what your local association offers in the way of:

Networking Opportunities – Most associations have several per month. Many have a weekly “Tips Club” or “Business Card Exchange” where members can share customer/client leads. Other groups offer after-hours coffees and/or monthly luncheons. All of these events give the small business owner an opportunity to build relationships with other business owners in the area who can provide insights unique to the local marketplace.

Special Insurance Rates and Information – Many associations (usually the larger ones) offer members special rates on health insurance and worker’s compensation. Some associations offer workshops to educate new business owners about the kinds of insurance they will need.

Educational Programs – Most associations (no matter how large or small) offer at least a few yearly educational programs of interest to small business owners, including workshops about tax laws, record keeping, computing for business, marketing, etc. Some do this on a monthly basis. Find out how regularly your association provides these kinds of opportunities and ask what subjects have been covered in past programs.

Security Services – Business owners who can’t afford to pay for a security service on their own pool money with other members in the association and pay to have the business area patrolled (since businesses are all within a few miles of one another). Also, some associations set up a business “Block Watch.” One business owner on each block watches out and lets everyone on that block know if anything suspicious is seen.

A Member Directory – Most associations publish a yearly directory, which lists each member’s business name, address, and phone number. These directories are given to each member and are also sent to board members of local homes associations, churches, schools, and other area groups so the entire community is made aware of the products and services available by area businesses.

Discount Rates – Often members of an association are able to pool their resources to get advertising from newspapers, radio, TV, etc. at a discount rate, as well as discounts on other products and services like shipping, pagers and cell phones, etc.

Yearly Events – Many associations sponsor a yearly event designed to increase members’ visibility within the community – something like a street fair or a festival. It’s a great way to introduce people in the community to their local business owners. An association might also offer a “Tax Day Conference” to bring representatives from every sort of tax agency under one roof to answer tax questions, conduct seminars and distribute information in a “non-threatening” environment. Individual business owners would spend a lot more money to get this kind of extensive information on their own.

Community Service Opportunities – Some business associations raise money to provide community service projects in their areas or they simply donate money to local groups. This creates goodwill between business owners and members of the community. Not only does the community benefit from this, the business owner does, too. When residents feel a local business is friendly and caring they’re more apt to buy the services or products of that business.

A Newsletter and Web Site – A monthly newsletter lets a business owner know what’s going on with other businesses in his area. It also gives him a chance to have his business spotlighted from time to time. Some associations have a “Member of the Month” featured in each newsletter, and press releases introduce new businesses to the community. Many associations now have Web sites, which give business owners even more opportunities for promoting their products and services.

A Chance to Speak Out – Joining your local business association gives you a collective voice for determining what will happen within your business neighborhood. Associations usually work together with area homes associations, schools, churches, etc. for the overall good of the community. Find out how closely these groups work together in your area.

Obviously, every association can’t offer ALL of the above benefits, but most members still find their local business association a source of invaluable support.

To find the association in your area, look in the Yellow Pages under “Business Associations” or call your Chamber of Commerce. Attend one of their meetings, ask questions, and find out if your local business association is right for you.

For more business tips and information, visit The Lieurance Group at and sign up for the mailing list to receive Unite to Write, an ebook of articles to use on your own website, blog, and ezines. For helpful articles about writing visit and sign up for The Morning Nudge, a few words of motivation and inspiration to help you get a little writing done each day.

All the Ws of a Business Plan

August 10th, 2020

A business plan is a written description of the future of your business and more importantly, how you are going to get there. It is a document that explains what you are going to do to make your company profitable and how you are going to achieve this. It defines both your business model and your strategies to make this business model work and more importantly profitable.

Normally when a business idea arises, you know what resources and capabilities you have at the start of your business and where you want to go in a certain period, usually in 3 or 5 years. But what is the way to reach that goal? Where to start? How to arouse investor interest? Even, how to get your business off the ground? Everything seems so easy when you have the great money winning idea and concept. It is how you are going to achieve these dreams and get enough money to keep the business going for many years to come.

Writing a business plan is to build a map that will guide you to where you start making money with your initial business idea. At is very basic structure, your business plan is a mixture of strategies and plans. It involves financials, marketing, staffing and products. Think of it as the foundation to your new business.

WHAT are the reasons that I might need one?
• To look for investors.
• To apply for a loan.
• To establish the viability of your business idea.
• To make improvements to your current business.
• To expand your current business.

All of these types have different emphasises and a different structure.

WHAT is a business plan?
It is a tool or document that describes a business opportunity or idea, the work team, the operational and marketing execution strategies, the business risks and the economic viability of your business. A well written document guides you to turn an idea into a viable business.

It can also be defined in another context in that the business plan becomes a fundamental tool within the analysis of a new business opportunity, a diversification plan, an internationalisation project, the acquisition of a company or an external business unit, or even the launch of a new product or service within the current business.

To summarise, both for the development or launch of a startup and for the analysis of new business investments, the business plan becomes an indispensable tool. So even though you have an established business, you will still need a business plan as you expand and improve that business.

A business plan is never finished and should be reviewed from time to time at least annually but certainly when large changes to an existing company are anticipated. This implies that every plan must adapt effectively and efficiently to the changes, helping the project to continue.

WHAT is the point of a business plan?
Many entrepreneurs think they only need a business plan when they are seeking investment or when the bank asks for one. However the act of business planning, when completed correctly, enables the entrepreneur to carry out an extensive market study that will provide the information required to design the best possible business model that will be both profitable and efficient.

Additionally, the business plan will develop the strategic measures for all functional areas that will enable them achieve the objectives for the new business.
Once written, the business plan will serve as an internal tool to assess the management of the company and its deviations from the planned scenario. Proposing, if necessary, adaptations to the agreed business model in order to obtain updated information for the daily management of the company. This will include preparation of the required changes and processes to bring the business back on track.

So lets dive into the concepts behind business planning a bit more.

The WHY of The Business Plan
• Why do you want your business plan?
• Why are you writing the plan now?

The WHAT of the Business Plan
• What is the purpose of developing a specific plan?
• In what period do you consider it possible to carry out your projects?
• What is your business model?
• What is your Value Proposition?
• What are your products or services to be offered?
• What positioning do you plan to develop to compete?
• What are your measurements of success?
• What markets do you plan to penetrate?
• What market percentage do you estimate to obtain?
• What margins do you consider possible?
• What income do you consider you will receive?
• What are the costs of expansion?
• What are the costs of obtaining new customers?
• What do you want to do with your business?
• What strategies do you want to undertake – financial, marketing and planning

The WHERE of the Business Activity
• Where will your products be sold from? Shop, office, website, social media, road side, party planning,
• Where are you based? Locally, centrally, virtually etc.
• Where are your products produced?
• Where are your distribution channels?
• Where are they going to be sold?
• Where is your market?
• Where will your staff need to be based?

The WHEN of your business planning activities
• When will you need to start your new activities?
• When will they end?
• When will your investor need to invest?
• When will your investor get their money back?
• When will you have enough staff to carry out your new changes?
• When will your products and services be available?
• When will your products need to be updated and/or improved?
• When is the best time to attract new customers?

WHO do you present your plan to?
• Bank for loan purposes and they will take a charge over a property usually.
• Investor to join your company as a shareholder.
• Angle Investor to join as a shareholder but also be involved in the running of your company.
• Management team so they know what is expected of them.
• Suppliers who will be offering credit.
• Director level hires so that they are encouraged to join your company.
• Believe it or not the entrepreneur should also refer back on a regular basis.

As you can see there are a lot of Ws involved with a business plan – the biggest W is why should you write a business plan and the answer is – because it is such a great business tool.

Why Start and Incorporate a Business Association

March 11th, 2020

When you are starting a business, one of your main objectives is the potential expansion of your company and to become a major player in the market. There are many ways to grow and today we want to show you an effective way to join forces with your competitors and incorporating a Business Association. Ideally this Association would be representative of your industry and will include major companies in the sector. Establishing a new Association is rather simple and inexpensive. Incorporating an Association requires some paperwork but benefits outweigh the time and effort.

But remember there are differences between an incorporated Business Association and non-incorporated Association. We always encourage incorporating your Association as they offer several practical and potential benefits.

Here are some benefits that may help you to decide:

Accessing to More Funds
By starting an Association you have the ability to borrow funds from banks. Also by qualifying for tax exempt status, it is more likely to have access to public and private grants. You may use these funds in starting campaigns in order to promote your products or industry.

Tax Exemption
Business Associations usually are exempt from paying property and income taxes. In another word as long as income is related to charitable activities, your Association will not pay income tax on it.

Power of Advocacy
By forming a Business Association you will have the power to influence politics and lobby among decision-making public authorities and use this power in benefiting of your industry.

Protection from Personal Liabilities
Your Association can be a target of an unwanted lawsuit due to its advocacy efforts however, incorporated Association will play its role to put you in a better situation and protect you from potential issues. A Business Association may be sued, but its legal protections will shield personal belongings of members and officers such as properties, vehicles and money which are generally protected from personal liability.

Gather Donations
When you are working for the right cause you will be amazed to know that there are many donors out there willing to help you. Tax laws usually encourage people and corporations to donate funds and properties to non-profit organizations. If your Business Association qualifies as a tax exempt organization, it is more likely to gather donations, as donors can deduct it on federal and state tax returns.

Separate Legal Status
A Business Association has its own legal status and bylaws and as a result, it has the power to sign contracts in its own name, giving them the ability to have transactions apart from its members or officers. An Association may also take legal action against others if necessary.

Property Ownership
An Incorporated Business Association has the right of holding a property title. You may find it strange but in some places unincorporated Associations do not have this right to hold a title on their name.

There are also other small benefits to the incorporation of a Business Association which vary by country and location. For example in the United States of America you can get a discount on your postage.

Remember! The main benefit to start and incorporate a Business Association is to have a united voice in the industry.

Marketing, Promoting and Advertising Your Business

February 28th, 2020

One thing that goes without saying in today’s business world, is that regardless of the nature of your home based business, a website is an absolute MUST. Whether you have a product or service to sell, whether local or global, your business will go nowhere fast if you don’t have an online presence. If you need internet marketing help, you’ve landed on the right article. I’ll give you some home based business marketing ideas that will help you promote your business successfully.

The first step is choosing a domain name and getting it registered. You can build your own website (if you have the time) and host it yourself or you can have everything done by another company (if you have the money). Either way, you have many options and tools at your disposal that can align with your business plan and budget. Also note that you can still start your own home based business even if you don’t have a product or service to sell. There are thousands of individuals and companies that have products you can sell for them while earning a commission, called affiliate marketing.

Of the many business marketing strategies known to man, internet marketing is, hands down, the best strategy to use for promoting a home based business as it is the cheapest method and has the potential for reaching millions of people all over the globe. Driving traffic to your site through online resources is like killing two birds with one stone. You can tackle print advertising by writing articles and publishing them to directories and ezines and by submitting ads to the many available (and most of them free) classified ad sites. Online media advertising encompasses writing press releases and distributing them to press release sites. One of the biggest and most popular online advertising trends today is via social media advertising through sites such as Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn where you build relationships with your customers. Forums and communities are also great ways to build relationships which helps promote your home based business in the long run. Simply Google your market or industry with the word ‘forum’ or ‘community’ behind it and search for one or two that seem to be the best fit for you.

All of these methods of online advertising contribute to search engine optimization (SEO), which is to say improving your online visibility and escalating in the search engines like Google, Yahoo and Bing. Your goal is to claim the #1 spot in the organic search results (the results on the left, not the right side which are paid ads). This is where your traffic will come from. If you are 800 in the list of search results, no one is ever going to see your site because very few people have the time or patience to scroll through 800 search results. Research shows that people typically won’t even scroll past 4 or 5 search results, let alone 800.

Can you grasp the importance of internet marketing for any business? If you are new to the internet marketing phenomenon and don’t know exactly where to start, there are many great programs or systems online that walk you through every aspect of marketing your online business. A lot of these systems were created by online entrepreneurs who have spent thousands of their own dollars trying to figure it all out over the years and finally DID. Their sacrifices have made it easier for newbies to become successful at their own online home based business. If you are new to running your own home based business, I recommend you find a great system (do your research, read reviews, ask questions in forums) and start marketing your home business from there. Don’t waste the time and money that so many of us have in going it alone, without a proven system, as it will just set you back further and hinder your progress.